April Earthly Findings

April’s Earthly Findings

 

The Get Down & TIME The Kalief Browder Story

 

    The much anticipated part two of The Get Down came out this year. The second half of the season was just as good as the first part. The show is about the origins of Hip Hop in the late 1970s. It takes place in the birthplace of Hip Hop, The Bronx. I love the cast of characters because they all have different dreams and aspirations that you want for them as you watch the show. It has it’s fair share of drama but, I wouldn’t say that it was anything too crazy. A lot of it is teen drama. However, I think that it is significantly refreshing compared to the way a lot teen drama is portrayed on television. Also, I love a good period piece and I asked my dad a lot of questions about how accurate some of the things in the show was. Everyone that I know that have seen the show, really enjoy it! If you haven’t seen it yet, check it out. It features some familiar faces like Jaden Smith and Shameik Moore (from Dope).

 

    The Kalief Browder Story left me feeling uneasy. The short documentary series was about the life of Kalief Browder while he was in jail and the time he came home that led up to his death. Kalief Browder was arrested when he was 16 for a petty crime he hadn’t committed. He then spent 3 years imprisoned in Riker’s Island, without trial. This time, and too much time spent in solitary confinement, led to his suicide some time after his release. Watching this story and knowing the outcome, weighed heavy on my heart throughout the series. I think that the best part of the series was that there was such a call for Rikers closing and the prevention of New York allowing this again. I think that everyone should watch this to learn more about this case and be vigilant so that this never happens again.

 

    Both of these programs tell stories that matter in two different ways. Representation really matters and hopefully we see more shows like this in the future that shine a light on important issues or creative African American narratives.

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